[Answer] Venice’s St. Mark’s Square is home to what palace?

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Venice’s St. Mark’s Square is home to what palace?

…1. Buckingham Palace 2. Doge’s Palace 3. Pitti Palace 4. Palacio Colonna

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Doge's Palace - At the heart of Venice’s St. Mark’s Square stands the Palazzo Ducale, or Doge’s Palace. The current building, which dates to 1340 and was expanded over the following centuries, is a magnificent example of Venetian Gothic architecture. It served as the seat of government for the former Venetian Republic, whose elected rulers were called doges. The palace also housed the city’s courtrooms and is linked to the city's historic prison cells via the Bridge of Sighs. After the fall of the Venetian Republic in 1797, the palace held administrative offices and a public library. The Italian government turned it into a public museum in 1923.:

Venice’s St. Mark’s Square is home to what palace?

 

ANSWER : Doge’s Palace – At the heart of Venice’s St. Mark’s Square stands the Palazzo Ducale, or Doge’s Palace. The current building, which dates to 1340 and was expanded over the following centuries, is a magnificent example of Venetian Gothic architecture. It served as the seat of government for the former Venetian Republic, whose elected rulers were called doges. The palace also housed the city’s courtrooms and is linked to the city’s historic prison cells via the Bridge of Sighs. After the fall of the Venetian Republic in 1797, the palace held administrative offices and a public library. The Italian government turned it into a public museum in 1923.:

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