[Answer] What is eggplant called in the United Kingdom?

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What is eggplant called in the United Kingdom?

…1. Mad apple 2. Aubergine 3. Purple melon 4. Eggplant

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Aubergine - When browsing the supermarket in the U.S., seeing an eggplant with its purple skin is customary. However, have you ever stopped to wonder why its name pays homage to eggs? Well, in the U.S., the term “eggplant” has been used since the early 1800s and refers to the vegetable’s likeness to a swan’s egg by English botanist and herbalist John Gerard. The U.K., however, opted for the name “aubergine.” Native to the Indian subcontinent, the aubergine first arrived in England in the late 1500s. The name aubergine itself is borrowed from the French. The word’s origin comes from the Catalan word “alberginia,” which came from the Arabic “al-badhinjan” and the Persian word “badingan” before that.:

What is eggplant called in the United Kingdom?

 

ANSWER : Aubergine – When browsing the supermarket in the U.S., seeing an eggplant with its purple skin is customary. However, have you ever stopped to wonder why its name pays homage to eggs? Well, in the U.S., the term “eggplant” has been used since the early 1800s and refers to the vegetable’s likeness to a swan’s egg by English botanist and herbalist John Gerard. The U.K., however, opted for the name “aubergine.” Native to the Indian subcontinent, the aubergine first arrived in England in the late 1500s. The name aubergine itself is borrowed from the French. The word’s origin comes from the Catalan word “alberginia,” which came from the Arabic “al-badhinjan” and the Persian word “badingan” before that.:

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